multimedia productions: the graying of AIDS: KAT_AIDS__Intro_title_card

Thanks to advances in medical treatment, people are living longer with HIV. As of 2015, half of those living with the virus in the United States are estimated to be over the age of 50. As the population of older Americans at risk for—or living with—HIV/AIDS grows, the daily realities and challenges of their lives remain largely invisible in our youth-oriented culture.The Graying of AIDS is a web documentary and educational campaign based on portraits, video and oral histories of long-term survivors and older adults who contracted HIV later in life. Combined with HIV/AIDS public health tools, it aims to increase awareness, sensitivity, and collaboration among care-giving professionals. View the project website.Read an op ed in POZ Magazine about the project.Sampler of interviews with LGBT longterm survivors.View a write-up on TIME LightBox and read the original 2006 essay in Time Magazine (paywall).

Thanks to advances in medical treatment, people are living longer with HIV. As of 2015, half of those living with the virus in the United States are estimated to be over the age of 50. As the population of older Americans at risk for—or living with—HIV/AIDS grows, the daily realities and challenges of their lives remain largely invisible in our youth-oriented culture. 

The Graying of AIDS is a web documentary and educational campaign based on portraits, video and oral histories of long-term survivors and older adults who contracted HIV later in life. Combined with HIV/AIDS public health tools, it aims to increase awareness, sensitivity, and collaboration among care-giving professionals.  

View the project website

Read an op ed in POZ Magazine about the project. 

Sampler of interviews with LGBT longterm survivors. 

View a write-up on TIME LightBox and read the original 2006 essay in Time Magazine (paywall).